1. To What Place

    At To What Place, expat Jaughna shares stories about food and travel from destinations less commonly explored. Her blog won the Saveur Reader’s Choice and Editor’s Choice awards for “Best Culinary Travel Blog” this year.

    Cooking
  2. The Village Voice

    Here, you’ll find the archives for the widely acclaimed Village Voice, the United States’ first alternative weekly newspaper, covering counter-culture from 1955 to 2018.

    Art
  3. Ladybird Education

    Ladybird Education is an international resource of teaching materials to help school children learn English. The large library of Ladybird books can each be unlocked to access more teaching resources and ebook versions of each publication.

    Academia
    Photo by Lina Kivaka (via Pexels)
  4. Society and Space

    Scholars from the U.S. and Canada collaborate on a peer-reviewed journal and this companion website examining the social struggles over access to and control of space, place, territory, region, and resources.

    Academia
  5. Angry Birds

    Check out the online home of Angry Birds, the stars of the movie and mobile game franchise that celebrates 10 years of anger in 2019.

    Film
  6. ArabLit

    The blog Arabic Literature is managed and curated by M. Lynx Qualey. She also oversees ArabLit Quarterly, a magazine published four times a year, and co-hosts BULAQ, a book-centric podcast. Together, these projects focus on Arabic literature, art, news, and much more.

    Academia
  7. AFROPUNK

    Celebrating Black culture from Brooklyn to Johannesburg, AFROPUNK covers music, activism, art, and more.

    Art
  8. Violins and Violinists

    Happy World Violin Day! Benjamin Hebbert blogs about the life of a violin dealer and his passion for violins that sound beautiful — and tell an amazing story, too.

    Music
  9. Houston Zoo

    The Houston Zoo connects communities with animals! Through education, the zoo inspires visitors to save and protect wildlife.

    Animals
  10. december magazine

    december magazine was created in 1958 by a group of poets, writers, and artists: “We are humanists…far more concerned with people than dogmatic critical or aesthetic attitudes.” Many of the new-to-us voices they publish go on to major literary success — think Rita Mae Brown, Raymond Carver, Joyce Carol Oates.

    Authors