1. Remembering Mr. Rogers

    Anthony Breznican recalls an encounter with Mr. Rogers, who was as kind in real life as his cardigan-wearing, fish-feeding, television alter ego.

    Commentary
  2. : the great debate :

    Musings on inspiration that will resonate with any blogger: “Ideas, I’ve decided, are like birds, very, very skittery. Attempt a sudden grab and, fwip, away it goes.” The Whirly Girl had a great idea for a post… but what was it, again?

    Humor
  3. Lake Ransom

    “Sometimes, music can communicate in a space uninhabitable by even the most wildly ambitious words,” writes John at Windstrewn. “Lake Ransom” is his latest piece: an original, ambient musical composition.

    Music
  4. A hijab by any other name is…fashion.

    “I happen to be a Muslim, hijab-wearing woman, and somehow, I do not think this is a huge step forward for us.” An alternate take on high-fashion hijab from The Modest Life.

    Culture
  5. The Arrow

    Haiku and photography by Melinda Green Harvey: Don’t be fooled by that / arrow: everything that counts / is on the other side.

    Photography
    Photo by Melinda Green Harvey
  6. It’s Not What You Think

    “It’s possible that, along with grunge, Generation X’s other great gift to society is depression.” In his tribute to Chris Cornell, Rich Larsen reflects on despair, aging, and his generation’s struggles with mental health.

    Commentary
    Image by Andreas Eldh (CC BY 2.0)
  7. Family Genes

    All the males in Neil Kramer’s family had an inherited muscular disorder — but none of them ever talked about it, or sought help. Neil breaks that pattern.

    Family
  8. breaking the surface

    Tenille Campbell recognized burnout and then did something about it: “But slowly, slowly, I felt like I couldn’t breathe. I couldn’t feel the joy. I couldn’t feel the passion. I felt… grey. Nothing. Absent.”

    Commentary
    Photo by Tenille Campbell
  9. A Porker of a Personal Best!

    Ashley Rae recounts landing the big one — a personal best carp on Lake Ontario: “One wrong move and this fish could be gone.”

    Sports
  10. “an ocean”: A Poem by Charlotte Covey

    At Hawaii Pacific Review, a Charlotte Covey poem on writing, wonder, and danger: “you will never be / just a poem. you will / be rocks breaking / ribs, angelfish kissing / wounds.”

    Poetry
  11. On Descriptive Grammar and Banal Bigotry

    In a provocative post, Dustin Atlas says everyone should join the grammar police: “Giving up on proper grammar is fine. Giving up on better grammar — which requires correcting each other — is not.”

    Commentary
  12. Don’t Look

    A former museum assistant unearths drawings in an old, tiny sketchpad, kept in the pocket of a blazer during shifts in the galleries.

    Humor
  13. New Cookbook Preview from Smitten Kitchen

    “These are the recipes for the food that makes us happy.” Deb Perelman at Smitten Kitchen shares a recipe for Cacio e Pepe Potatoes Anna and talks about her new cookbook, Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites.

    Authors
  14. Why I Wrote “Walt’s Disneyland”

    “I believe Walt built Disneyland as a gift to his own inner child . . .” Jim Denney explains why he wrote his new book, Walt’s Disneyland.

    Authors
  15. The Art of Jumping

    Joseph Lyttleton describes New York City: “It’s impatient and unkind, expensive and exclusive, unimpressed by anything you’ve ever done. The city doesn’t need you or want you, thank you very much; although, it’ll gladly have another meal.”

    Commentary
  16. The Comfort of Familiar Things

    Jennifer Balink has been thinking about getting a tattoo — and the idea leads her to reflect about family, permanence, and a Mother’s Day gift from years ago.

    Essay
  17. Mother’s Day Strike

    Alexis Kanda-Olmstead advocates for a Mother’s Day Strike: “We don’t labor on Labor Day, so why should we mother on Mother’s Day?”

    Family
  18. Who Says Sorry

    Poetry by Rebecca Hazelton: The habit of sealing up sweetness, / of saving but never / tasting, isn’t lost / when the drones disperse, / and the queen is / left to starve.

    Poetry
    Photo by A.J. Cann
  19. The Book And The Baby

    Sarah Menkedick on publishing her first book: “By the time it comes out the intensive period that held and fostered its creation has passed. . . And so to hold this book in my hands also felt like holding my child’s babyhood, and my nascent motherhood, realizing that I have come through it.”

    Essay
    Photo by Jorge Santiago
  20. Cancer in Canada

    Canadians’ odds of getting sick or dying depend surprisingly on where they live. Check out the National Post’s interactive map to learn more about cancer in Canada.

    Data
  21. Poets and Borders

    What does it mean to live on or cross the border? What does it mean to be a citizen? Are there borders beyond those that are geographic? At Poetry International, a magazine at San Diego State University, poets from around the world share their thoughts on borders.

    Identity
  22. The Bucket Drummer

    From a poem by musician Thomas Brett:
     
    “but the thing about the beat
    that cuts through consciousness
    is its sameness
    which reminds you how here you are too
    walking by this corner again”

    Music
  23. The Winter Almost Broke Me; the Spring May Not Be Long Enough

    Evelyn Shoop on postpartum depression: “I need to have somewhere to come to remember how deep and raw the wound of postpartum depression felt, so that it can hopefully, maybe, allow me to approach others with deep compassion even when the memories fade.”

    Family
  24. My mum, the pilot

    Hey Loons’ mother became the first lady pilot in Assam, British India, in 1961: “. . . without radios gaining permission to land was simply a case of circling the airstrip until the light at the control tower turned green.”

    Family
  25. How I lost my mother, found my family, recovered my identity

    Betty Ann Adam recounts her experiences as a child of the “’60s Scoop” — a period which spanned 30 years in Canada — where Indigenous children were removed from their families in a government-sanctioned bid to “remove the Indian from the child.”

    Abuse