1. Don’t Be Like Me: Take the Help, Dummy

    “Soon enough—a few weeks, a few months—and the poem seems to me like a cardboard cutout of a puppy: inauthentic, inflexible, lacking in depth or life. I don’t know why this is, but I hate it.” At The Gloria Sirens, Katie Riegel encourages other poets to be humble and willing to accept help.

    Inspiration
  2. Take a Break from December with the Year’s Best Longreads

    Shut out the hustle and bustle for 15 minutes, and dig into a good story.

    Journalism
  3. Who We Are: A Letter to The Shrine

    Battling her own cancer and in the throes of chemotherapy, Denise Archer used a late friend’s clothing to make quilts for the children she left behind. “Some of your mom’s hair is inside,” I told them.” “Also, if you breathe in deeply, you can smell her.”

    Death
  4. Can You Go On A Break From Your Own Sister?

    Rebecca Schuman uses the lens of her ’70s upbringing to offer sage (and hilarious!) advice to readers at “ask a gen-xer.” In this installment, Schuman tackles the thorny question of how to manage a toxic sibling relationship during a wedding.

    Humor
  5. Turkish Sunrise (Piano Composition)

    Check out Steven Zheng’s original piano composition, “Turkish Sunrise.”

    Art
    Photo by Stephan Seeber from Pexels
  6. The Philosophical Salon

    Published by the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Philosophical Salon‘s mission is to bring together leading intellectuals from across the world in a single forum.

    Culture
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  7. Animals
  8. Signs of the City

    There is so much character and life in Shari Blaukopf’s watercolor dépanneur, as captured on the streets of Montréal, Canada.

    Art
    By Shari Blaukopf
  9. Alabaster

    “Alabaster” appears in poet Stephanie L. Harper’s chapbook “This Being Done”: “I am a pink rose petal’s pale glow / black ash tamped in furrows / between the breaths of the living…”

    Poetry
  10. Too Close to Call

    “Across our 50 states we vote by mail, ranked-choice selection, provisionally, and by absentee— the fact we can know anything on election night is nothing short of a bureaucratic miracle. So the spectacle of election night television should be considered as just that: entertainment only loosely connected to determining the shift in political power.”

    Current Events