Work Filter
  1. I Didn’t Realize that I Could Be a Voice for a Population of People

    “All I’ve wanted from the beginning is just to put a human face on poverty that is not the one that we think of…” Stephanie Land, who wrote a memoir on working as a maid and being a single mother, first found an audience on her blog.

    Authors
  2. I Have a Passion for Creating Things that Have Value for Other People

    “Spelling really taught me time management and work ethic.” Cole Shafer‑Ray of The Spelling Champ turned his knack for words into an online consulting business.

    Business
  3. Why I Can’t Write a Good Personal Essay

    At Tenure, She Wrote, a grad student explains her decision no longer to write narratives of inspiration and gumption: “A little smarts and hard work and luck can’t make my chronically ill body ‘productive.’”

    Academia
  4. I Applied to 200 Jobs and All I Got Was This Moderate-Severe Depression

    “Like most ambitious English majors, I hoped I would find work in either teaching or writing after graduation. Long story short, I ended up graduating magna cum laude, won my department’s award, and learned that no one really wants to talk about E.M. Forster while playing beer pong. Go figure.”

    Academia
    Image from Flazingo Photos via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
  5. How Do You Move Past Rejection? A Writer Reflects

    For Holland Rae, a “no” can be deflating — but also energizing.

    Authors
  6. How Soprano Charlotte Hoather Took Her Singing — and Blogging — to New Heights

    The up-and-coming singer shares insight on building community, using social media, and finding time to blog even on busy weeks.

    Culture
    Images courtesy of Charlotte Hoather, with kind permission of Waterperry Opera Festival.
  7. Hello Rejection, My Old Friend

    “I’d like to say who cares, but I do care.” Romance novelist Holland Rae writes on rejection — an integral part of the creative process for most artists and writers (not to mention job and college applicants) — and what keeps her motivated.

    Authors
  8. Charlotte Hoather, Soprano

    If you ever wondered what an opera singer’s daily life looks like, you’ll love Charlotte Hoather’s blog, where the British soprano invites visitors and fans behind the scenes (and occasionally on stage, too).

    Culture
  9. FemInEM

    FemInEM is a vibrant community hub for women who work in emergency medicine — and for anyone else who cares about diversity and equality in the medical professions.

    Data
  10. Why I Owe Everything to Jonathan Gold

    “Being a food writer is the most punk rock thing a person can do, and Jonathan Gold was the most punk rock of us all.” Javier Cabral pays homage to the legendary Los Angeles food writer, who was both his mentor and his role model.

    Current Events
    Illustration by Joaquin Hernandez
  11. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)
  12. The Book of Life

    The Book of Life, an offshoot of The School of Life, is a resource about the most substantial things in your life: your relationships, your income, your career, and your anxieties. It’s meant to be read bit by bit, as it continues to evolve — a site to return to over time.

    Exploration
  13. MiddleMe

    Malaysia-based entrepreneur Kally created MiddleMe as a space for career advice, tips for freelancers, and other resources and inspiration based on her wide-ranging experiences.

    Business
  14. Let’s go to a meeting

    M. Kelter at Invisible Strings on work, coping, and autism: “The words people say slowly turn into a staccato exchange, a call and answer that makes me think of birds. I listen along and pitch in verbal pauses and silences that hopefully convey a subtle attentiveness.”

    Autism
    Image by © Corbis via Flickr
  15. “If your work has value to anyone, then it should have value for you, and you should be at the front of the line to receive that value, because you’re doing the work.”

    Authors