Video Games Filter
  1. Futurism

    A leading web destination for the latest news, infographics, and videos on the science and technology that are shaping our future, from artificial intelligence and robotics to virtual reality.

    Culture
  2. A Geek Girl’s Guide

    Michelle Anneliese, a self-described “Ravenclaw from District 13,” writes on various aspects of geek culture — from gaming and cosplay to Harry Potter — with a fresh, always-curious perspective.

    Culture
  3. Archaeogaming

    From analyses of Tomb Raider to posts on vintage consoles, Archaeogaming is a blog dedicated to the discussion of the archaeology of video games — and in video games.

    Essay
  4. Screen Rant

    Screen Rant is one of the web’s biggest independent sites for entertainment news, reviews, and features, catering to casual watchers and movie and television buffs alike.

    Film
  5. No, virtual reality isn’t going to solve America’s policing problem.

    Can virtual reality training help reduce escalation in police encounters? Maybe not: “You can fuss with…how to optimize contact between public and law enforcement, but sometimes the solution is simply for that contact not to occur.”

    Jetpack
  6. Pokémon Go and the politics of digital gaming in public

    “Airbnb owns no properties; Uber owns no cars; Pokémon Go is just some markers on a map. The politics is someone else’s problem.” A critique on Pokémon Go, the nonconsensual use of public and private space, and the flânerie of today’s augmented reality game players.

    Commentary
  7. What Second Life Means to Me

    Virtual novelist, poet, and photographer Huckleberry Hax celebrates Second Life with a video based on his experiences in the far reaches of the online virtual world.

    Identity
  8. Funk’s House of Geekery

    Looking for some self-righteous rambling about whether Superman or Batman would win in a fight? Look no further than this celebration of movies, comics, books, games, and all things geek. (FYI, the answer is Batman.)

    Comics
  9. That Dragon, Cancer

    “It’s not just a literal narrative about a family with a terminally ill child. It’s a journey through the doubts and struggles of the soul.” At Feminist Frequency, Carolyn Petit reviews That Dragon, Cancer, a video game that chronicles the lives of creators Ryan and Amy Green, whose son is diagnosed with a rare form of cancer.

    Storytelling
  10. The Search For Female Characters

    “It’s 2014, and this year’s E3 showed just how much women are still missing from the boy’s club that is the games industry.” Elizabeth Chapin at The Daily Geekette comments on the lack of female protagonists in Assassin’s Creed: Unity and how women are still ignored in the game development process.

    Diversity
  11. The Nerds of Color

    Pop culture with a different perspective, from a community of fans who love superheroes, sci-fi, fantasy, and video games but are not afraid to look at nerd/geek fandom with a culturally critical eye.

    Identity
  12. Problem Machine

    Musings on video games, game theory, software development, creativity, and life from a gave developer trying to stay focused on the Next Great Game.

    Video Games
  13. I Am a Hero, and So Is Anita Sarkeesian

    “The Internet is becoming a crowded, ugly place. Anyone can post anonymously on sites like Reddit and YouTube, hiding behind fake usernames and indulging in the pseudo-courage that could only be afforded by a fake identity.” Roy Claflin on Anita Sarkeesian, anonymity, and nastiness on the web.

    Internet
  14. A Conversation About Race in Video Games

    “It’s time games stepped up and made the same commitment to narrative innovation and character exploration that they have to technical advancement.” In this discussion, Sidney Fussell and Jed Pressgrove talk about tackling complex, messy notions of identity to create more interesting, inclusive games.

    Diversity
  15. A Pixel Artist Renounces Pixel Art

    A pixel artist at Dinofarm Games on the joys and limitations of pixel art — and why they’re moving forward: “It’s not their problem that they don’t know what pixel art is, and it’s not their fault. Choosing pixel art was ultimately self-serving and wound up confusing and even frustrating people. This is all because we failed to embrace the medium.”

    Art