Personal Musings / Posts Filter
  1. The Internet Made Me Hate My Notebook (But I Fixed It. We’re Good Now.)

    K.C. Wise tries different notebooks, from various Moleskines to a Bullet Journal to a SELF Journal — then back again to a Moleskine: “. . . my relationship with the Moleskine notebook started very simply. Girl meets simple black notebook and falls in love.”

    Inspiration
    Image by <a href="https://blackbunchedmassmom.com/2018/01/09/the-internet-made-me-hate-my-notebook-but-i-fixed-it-were-good-now/"Black. Bunched. Mass. Mom.
  2. Depression is a Loaded Gun

    Derek Powazek comes to terms with his lifelong companion, depression: “I cannot keep doing the things I always have done. I can’t let depression define me, I can’t fight it, I can’t pretend it away. I have choose to do something else.”

    Jetpack
  3. I feel it in my bones.

    “An old wives’ tale. You can’t predict the weather with bones, I’d say. But my skeleton says other things. I take two aspirin and get back into bed. My head is too full of clouds. My face burns and my hands hold a fever that cracks like firewood.”

    Mental Health
    Image by Praveen (CC BY 2.0)
  4. Should You Write Every Day? A Close Look at the Oldest Piece of Writing Advice

    Nathaniel Tower is a writer with a family and a full-time job — and his position on whether or not a daily writing habit is crucial has become more nuanced over time.

    Authors
  5. A journey through severe depression

    “My children grew despite my hollowness.  They smiled and ate; played and worked.  I wonder if they saw me pretending to live or if they were fooled by me too.  Lola, the masterful charlatan.”

    Mental Health
  6. This is my rock and roll love letter to you.

    Veteran blogger Angela has been writing Fluid Pudding since 2001. The warm, witty voice that has kept fans reading for almost 17 years is in full effect in this ode to her recently-demolished childhood home.

    Family
  7. The Shape of Goodness

    Blogger Cate remembers her friend: “Something larger and finer than a single human departs when such a person dies:  a grace, a hope, a loveliness. An encouragement in a world that desperately needs encouragement.”

    Death
  8. 27 – summergo

    Blogger David recounts a fly-fishing trip gone horribly wrong: “I had broken my own knee with my hands to free myself from certain death by drowning.”

    Personal Musings
  9. Hope Is The Light of A Smoke-Streaked Sun

    “The world is burning yet the sun still shines.” As Northern Califonia burns, Lisa depends on hope, family, and small moments of beauty to work through each day’s new series of disasters.

    Current Events
  10. Walls

    On teenage rebellion, thwarted: “Nothing had changed. I was still the same person with the same stupid clothes and the same baby toys. The house was still library quiet and Richard Marx was still my favorite singer.”

    Identity
  11. Head Inside the Head

    Hedia Anvar writes of Rome(ance) and the end of love: “You’ll always return to Rome like an addict, except on the Vespa, it’s you flowing through Rome’s arteries.”

    Jetpack
  12. Love, Tokyo

    Writer Bron reflects on leaving her home and job and South Africa to move to Tokyo, Japan. “Here I am neither an insider nor an outsider, still foreign, but not out of place.”

    Jetpack
    Kumi Obata, Refreshing dream, etching (2007)
  13. The last days in our first home

    “Memories accumulated as we marked milestones and anniversaries. We grew older together in this house . . . but we grew happier, too.” Heide reflects on selling and letting go of her home of 20 years.

    Personal Essay
  14. The Uneasy Life of a Middle East Skeleton

    “So for those who knew, it must have been very strange that we have dead bones in our closet.” The Caspers are an American expat family in Cairo, Egypt. Jayson Casper tells the story of Max, the skeleton they’ve lived with, and explores a different view of death in Middle East culture.

    Culture
  15. Stripped for Parts

    Courtenay Bluebird on writing stories: “Writers pocket these moments and pull them out to look at later under a lamp with a notebook. This is fine with me—it’s magpie stealing. It is general and gestural and often sweet.”

    Essay