Personal Musings Filter
  1. My secret battle.

    Simon Thomas on depression, anxiety, and grief:  “Right now all I can muster is the strength to hold onto that rock and try my best, to try and be as Godly a Dad as I can for Ethan and trust that out of this fog of grief all that I felt before will clear…”

    Death
  2. The MFA Years

    Founded and edited by Caitlin Neely, The MFA Years follows the experiences of first and second year MFA candidates in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

    Academia
  3. “So you keep a secret drawer with a few items of her favorite clothes. And you retreat to press your face into them, searching for the familiar scent of her that has long since faded.” — Suzanne Leitz on the marks left by loss.

    Death
  4. Confessions of a Part-Time Mom

    Angela Noel on co-parenting and experiencing loss as a part-time mom: “Sucked into this hole are the smiles I won’t see. The giggles I miss. . . . These all live in the hole in my body, the blackhole place where he lives a life outside of the life he shares with me.”

    Family
    Photo by Angela Noel
  5. Note to Self – A Guide to Self Preservation in My Senior Years

    “Be someone you would like to remember.” What advice would you give to yourself in your senior years? At Life After 50, Lynn compiles 18 pieces of wisdom for her older self.

    Inspiration
    Image via Life After 50
  6. The Internet Made Me Hate My Notebook (But I Fixed It. We’re Good Now.)

    K.C. Wise tries different notebooks, from various Moleskines to a Bullet Journal to a SELF Journal — then back again to a Moleskine: “. . . my relationship with the Moleskine notebook started very simply. Girl meets simple black notebook and falls in love.”

    Inspiration
    Image by <a href="https://blackbunchedmassmom.com/2018/01/09/the-internet-made-me-hate-my-notebook-but-i-fixed-it-were-good-now/"Black. Bunched. Mass. Mom.
  7. Depression is a Loaded Gun

    Derek Powazek comes to terms with his lifelong companion, depression: “I cannot keep doing the things I always have done. I can’t let depression define me, I can’t fight it, I can’t pretend it away. I have choose to do something else.”

    Jetpack
  8. I feel it in my bones.

    “An old wives’ tale. You can’t predict the weather with bones, I’d say. But my skeleton says other things. I take two aspirin and get back into bed. My head is too full of clouds. My face burns and my hands hold a fever that cracks like firewood.”

    Mental Health
    Image by Praveen (CC BY 2.0)
  9. Should You Write Every Day? A Close Look at the Oldest Piece of Writing Advice

    Nathaniel Tower is a writer with a family and a full-time job — and his position on whether or not a daily writing habit is crucial has become more nuanced over time.

    Authors
  10. Fantasy (along with its twin sibling, science fiction), is the conceptual test ground for the world we are in the process of constructing, and what that world is like will be ultimately determined by what we find it possible to imagine and what will remain literally unimaginable.

    Personal Musings
  11. 365 Days of Inspiration: Our Readers’ Favorite Stories on Writing and Building Community

    From writing advice to hands-on blogging tips, these are 2017’s community favorites.

    Inspiration
    Art by Zach Ramey, from Two Way Tree, his and Jennifer Ramey's art blog.
  12. The Death Project

    Susan Briscoe’s blog documents her life with advanced terminal cancer, and focuses on her belief that “it’s important to talk about death and dying in this society that tries so hard to avoid it.”

    Culture
  13. haiku.blog

    Web developer Ben Dwyer has published a new haiku every day since March, 2015 — more than 1,000 days. Visit his archives at haiku.blog, where his march towards 2,000 haiku is already underway.

    Inspiration
  14. A journey through severe depression

    “My children grew despite my hollowness.  They smiled and ate; played and worked.  I wonder if they saw me pretending to live or if they were fooled by me too.  Lola, the masterful charlatan.”

    Mental Health
  15. “These babushkas survived Stalin and the Nazis. . . . How can they be expected to fear something neither male nor foreign, that does not even have feral teeth, but whose only crime is that it breathes and disappears into the same air.”

    Commentary