Nonfiction / Posts Filter
  1. The Possessed: Dispatches from the Third Trimester

    “The impulse to see pregnancy as a sci-fi curiosity turns pregnant people into something that is not human, or at least adds an asterisk to their humanity.” In this longread, Sara Fredman writes about pregnancy, demons, and Stranger Things.

    Essay
  2. Beer Samples By State

    Love craft beer? There are over 6,300 breweries across the U.S. and more than 150 different styles. On this list at BREWS ‘N’ BBQ, explore craft beers by state. All the beers have been consumed by the writers!

    Exploration
  3. The Big Issue

    The mission of The Big Issue is to dismantle poverty by creating opportunity, through self-help, social trading and business solutions.

    Journals & Magazines
  4. The marriages and murders of the Harcourt brothers of Oxfordshire 

    “Since this had left him without a wife, he asked to be absolved from the crime of murder, and to be granted dispensation to marry again.” Dr. Hannes Kleineke explores the Harcourt brothers in a blog dedicated to medieval members of the Parliament of England.

    Academia
  5. Saturday Afternoon Thoughts on the Apocalypse

    “It’s been said that no species can fully imagine its own extinction. Our inability to imagine ours may ultimately be the source of our undoing.” Kelly Hayes, the writer at Transformative Spaces, reflects on ecological collapse and the future of humanity and our world.

    Commentary
    Photo by Kelly Hayes
  6. Canada’s forgotten rainforest

    “These old-growth forests are not renewable. They’re not coming back after you log them.” Dive into this longread at The Narhwal about a rainforest deep in the interior of British Columbia that is being clear-cut as fast as the Amazon.

    Environment
  7. The Girl on the Train

    Erynn Brook compiles a thread of tweets, about her encounter with an 18-year-old stranger having a seizure on the subway, into a post on her blog.

    Commentary
  8. Wonder Woman

    “We’re all a little weird thanks to our mothers. I’m carrying that tradition on with my own children.” Mary Laura Philpott, who blogged previously at I Miss You When I Blink, shares an excerpt from her new essay collection at Longreads.

    Authors
  9. For the Record

    At Columbia Journalism Review, 18 journalists share how — or whether — they use tape recorders during interviews.

    Authors
  10. Wandling Free?

    Musings at Richly Evocative on the Wandle in London: “Walking next to a river, perhaps especially an urban survivor like the Wandle, is the chance to connect with something beyond ourselves. Where the river goes and how it turns, or loops back on itself, meanders and twists, is often nothing to do with us humans.”

    Environment
  11. My Goal Since the Beginning Was to Individualize the Victims

    “By colorizing their photographs, they become less abstract. They are no longer just representing something old, a historical event that happened so many years ago.” For the Faces of Auschwitz project, photo colorist Marina Amaral transforms photos of Holocaust victims.

    Education
  12. The Redemption of MS-13

    Journalist Danny Gold investigates the movement converting El Salvador’s gang members into born-again Christians. For those in the gangs, the only way out is through the door of the church.

    Journalism
    Illustration by Matt Chinworth
  13. Lit Hub’s Most Anticipated Books of 2019

    Start planning your 2019 reading schedule with Literary Hub’s exhaustive list of exciting future releases — including numerous titles by women writers and writers of color.

    Authors
  14. Queens of Infamy: The Rise of Catherine de’ Medici

    At Longreads, Anne Thériault wittily chronicles the early trials and tribulations of Renaissance queen Catherine de’ Medici, from her childhood in war-ravaged Florence to the first few years of her fraught marriage with the heir to the French throne.

    Essay
    Illustration by Louise Pomeroy.
  15. In Search of Beirut’s Collective Memory

    Journalist Iain Akerman follows Mona El Hallak, a Lebanese architect and activist, as she tries to reconstruct facets of the city’s past through the archive of a long-defunct photographer’s studio.

    Culture