Mental Health Filter
  1. Wolf Connection

    Wolf Connection is a youth education and empowerment program located in a therapeutic setting in the Angeles National Forest. With the help of rescued wolves and wolfdogs, young men and women (re)connect with nature, wildlife, and themselves.

    Animals
    Photo via Pixabay
  2. The Wanderlust Journal

    The content hub of the Wanderlust Festival website publishes year-round inspiration: posts that help you “ground into practice, reach new heights alongside experts, and stretch the definition of wellness.”

    Exploration
  3. Jessamyn Stanley

    Jessamyn Stanley is a yoga teacher, body positivity advocate, and speaker based in Durham, North Carolina. Her classes — for all bodies, abilities, and levels — provide a body positive approach to the practice.

    Health
  4. “Everyone around you . . . they’re all experiencing the collateral damage of living. They are all grieving someone, missing someone, worried about someone.”

    Death
  5. Sejal A. Shah on neurodiversity: “They say creativity arises in part from brain chemistry. Living with manic depressive illness has shaped me, created the contours of my adult life. I don’t tell everyone, but I am telling more.”

    Essay
  6. A Year of Great Writing: The Most-Read Editors’ Picks of 2018

    From mental health to writing, these are the posts that have resonated the most with Discover readers.

    Diversity
  7. Dealing with Darkness

    Making images helps Eduardo Mendoza to cope with mental illness: “Photography was and has been in the past weeks and months a way to cope with the extreme despair and desolation I was going through and my journey since then.

    Art
    Image by Eduardo Mendoza
  8. I Applied to 200 Jobs and All I Got Was This Moderate-Severe Depression

    “Like most ambitious English majors, I hoped I would find work in either teaching or writing after graduation. Long story short, I ended up graduating magna cum laude, won my department’s award, and learned that no one really wants to talk about E.M. Forster while playing beer pong. Go figure.”

    Academia
    Image from Flazingo Photos via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
  9. “Imagine having a swarm of rabid bumblebees trapped inside your head. There are hundreds of buzzing bees, and every single bee has its own project to do. Every bumblebee project is emergent and needs to be completed, in its entirety, immediately.”

    Mental Health
  10. The desert island.

    “…I think about all the photos of fat ladies with bodies like mine that have been used as objects of ridicule on funny cards and websites, because they dared do something as transgressive as wear a bathing suit at the beach, as though they were human or something.”

    Culture
    Illustration by Hana Jang (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).
  11. A Hermit’s Journey

    “I do not live alone, I live with myself.” At Photo Sociology, photography student Richard submits his coursework, writes, and shares photo essays. Here, he shares a very personal narrative about his mental health — and how photography is essential to his life.

    Exploration
  12. The Book of Life

    The Book of Life, an offshoot of The School of Life, is a resource about the most substantial things in your life: your relationships, your income, your career, and your anxieties. It’s meant to be read bit by bit, as it continues to evolve — a site to return to over time.

    Exploration
  13. My name is Wil Wheaton. I live with chronic depression, and I am not ashamed.

    “At that moment, I realized that I had lived my life in a room that was so loud, all I could do every day was deal with how loud it was. But with the help of my wife, my doctor, and medical science, I found a doorway out of that room.”

    Health
    Image via wilwheaton.net
  14. Take Up Space

    At Live a Well Life, Rose pens a letter to her former self. “I want you to know, that this body of yours, the one you berate, the one you use to control the chaos that is your life right now, this body is going to do something amazing one day.”

    Health
  15. I remembered the tree and the tree remembered me

    “I remember going for a walk in the woods behind my house instead, finding this tree and carving my initials into it, pressing the sadness and rejection into its innocent bark.” At Kindred, Kerstin Pless Grant recalls being 14 and rediscovers a tree she had hoped to return to someday.

    Essay