Longreads Filter
  1. Poets on Borders: Perspectives at Poetry International

    Poets from around the world share their perspectives on borders.

    Commentary
  2. “We abuse time, make it our enemy. We try to contain and control it, or, at the very least, outrun it. Your new-model, even faster phone; your finger on the “Close” button in the elevator; your same-day delivery.”

    Books
  3. Poets and Borders

    What does it mean to live on or cross the border? What does it mean to be a citizen? Are there borders beyond those that are geographic? At Poetry International, a magazine at San Diego State University, poets from around the world share their thoughts on borders.

    Identity
  4. How I lost my mother, found my family, recovered my identity

    Betty Ann Adam recounts her experiences as a child of the “’60s Scoop” — a period which spanned 30 years in Canada — where Indigenous children were removed from their families in a government-sanctioned bid to “remove the Indian from the child.”

    Abuse
  5. Exploring #Vanlife and Writing About Social Media Celebrities

    A Q&A with Rachel Monroe, who wrote about nomads in a vintage Volkswagen: “The idea of incorporating longer stints of rootlessness, even if there is a home base to come back to, is something that appeals to both professional vanlifers and people who are watching the trend from afar.”

    Culture
  6. Falling Half in Love with Strangers

    “The whole evening I had been suspended in a bubble with Max, and now I felt like I was holding a pin, ready to burst it and step out into the real world again.” Quinn describes a beautiful, meaningful encounter with a stranger in Vienna some years ago.

    Language
  7. My Daughter’s Birth

    After her partner gave birth to their daughter, blogger and scholar Lucy Allen reflects on a complicated delivery, made more so by hospital staff making her feel unequal and unacknowledged as a parent.

    Essay
  8. “Names have power.”

    Jena Barchas-Lichtenstein, a writer and linguistic anthropologist, reflects on the power of names to shape our identity — and to highlight both privilege and discrimination.

    Commentary
  9. Moved by Kim

    “Through his tears, he asked if they’d let him use heroin there.” Seth Davis Branitz on his brother’s drug addiction and death, and burying his entire immediate family within two months.

    Death
  10. State of Being: Envisioning California

    “California, the best of it, is what lives and prospers in a liminal, unnamed space—somewhere between dreams, disappointments, and recalibration.” Lynell George describes how California — Los Angeles and San Francisco — moves through you.

    Essay
  11. Falling in Love with Words: The Secret Life of a Lexicographer

    In the first chapter of her new book, Merriam-Webster lexicographer and Harmless Drudgery blogger Kory Stamper describes how she fell in love with words and offers a peek into the world of writing dictionaries.

    Authors
  12. Taking a Trip Through Love Canal: The Residuum

    “That’s where we are at. As a society, our bodies and minds are in such a poor condition that we cannot touch our proverbial toes—we cannot control ourselves, yet we want to control something outside of ourselves.” Jack Caseros on environmental contamination, not climate change, as our most pressing environmental issue.

    Commentary
  13. What is America Anyway? An Interview with Eula Biss

    “We have a president who was elected not by popular vote, but by electoral college. And, the history of the electoral college is intimately tied to slavery and slave-owning states and is there in part to give more sway to states that had large populations of slaves who couldn’t vote.”

    Authors
  14. The Complicated Past and Present of a California Utopia

    “And yet, like all utopian experiments, Esalen’s cracks widened as it grew in popularity and began to attract this wealthier set. Today’s guests hardly care about any sort of counterculture; they care, as Wolfe pointed out, about self-improvement.” Cody Delistraty spends a weekend at Big Sur’s Esalen Institute, once a bastion of hippie counterculture.

    Culture
  15. The Story of Heady Topper, America’s Most Loved Craft Beer

    How a difficult-to-obtain American double IPA brewed in a small town in Vermont developed a worldwide cult following, with beer fans traveling hundreds of miles just to get a taste.

    Business