Longreads Filter
  1. Canada’s forgotten rainforest

    “These old-growth forests are not renewable. They’re not coming back after you log them.” Dive into this longread at The Narhwal about a rainforest deep in the interior of British Columbia that is being clear-cut as fast as the Amazon.

    Environment
  2. Appalachian Trail Redemption

    “I’ve come to believe that a long hike has a biological cycle. Like almost everything—life, relationships, civilizations, songs, stories, stars—it is born in explosive uncertainty.” At Appalachia Journal, Ben Montgomery writes on divorce, loss, and taking his kids on a 244-mile walk to make sense of it all.

    Essay
    Photo via Ben Montgomery
  3. Type Investigations

    Type Investigations, formerly known as The Investigative Fund, incubates high-impact investigative reporting that holds the powerful accountable. On the site, you’ll read longform journalism published in partnership with media outlets.

    Essay
  4. The Best Journalism Across the Web Is Published on WordPress

    Explore journalism from some of the oldest, most respected publications on the web.

    Journalism
  5. Nowhere

    “In an age when stories are getting shorter and content dumbed-down, we are taking a different path.” Nowhere publishes longform and literary travel writing.

    Essay
  6. The Believer Magazine

    The Believer is a bimonthly literature, arts, and culture magazine that publishes journalism, essays, interviews, comics, poetry, a symposium around a theme, and a column by Nick Hornby.

    Culture
  7. Columbine, 20 Years Later

    Was it possible, we wondered, that Columbine, that seminal moment in American history, had taught us nothing?” A special issue at 5280 covers the community of Columbine, Colorado, 20 years after the Columbine High School shooting.

    Commentary
  8. Alta

    Alta publishes writing on the issues, culture, personalities, politics, lifestyle, and history of California and the West.

    Culture
    Photo by Oscar Salgado from Pexels
  9. Wandling Free?

    Musings at Richly Evocative on the Wandle in London: “Walking next to a river, perhaps especially an urban survivor like the Wandle, is the chance to connect with something beyond ourselves. Where the river goes and how it turns, or loops back on itself, meanders and twists, is often nothing to do with us humans.”

    Environment
  10. The Teen Idol Vanishes

    “Without 24/7 media, without the internet, a fiction like Dylan McKay could overtake a fact like Luke Perry.” 90210 star Luke Perry’s untimely death reminds us that Dylan McKay was one of the last icons of adolescence.

    Commentary
    Adam Scull / AP, Getty, Collage by Katie Kosma
  11. Reading in the Age of Constant Distraction

    “What I do when I look at Twitter is less akin to reading a book than to the encounter I have with a recipe’s instructions or the fine print of a receipt: I’m taking in information, not enlightenment.” Mairead Small Staid explores the work of Sven Birkerts and reading in our digital age.

    Books
    JOHAN GUDMUNDSEN-HOLMGREEN, LAESENDE LILLE PIGE, 1900
  12. The Indignities of Poverty, Compounded by the Requirement to Prove It

    In an excerpt from her debut memoir, WordPress.com blogger-turned-author Stephanie Land recalls moving from a homeless shelter to transitional housing with her young daughter.

    Authors
  13. My Year of Writing Anonymously

    “I found that when students wrote without their names, much that was awkward, dull, strained, and frankly boring fell away. It was like watching people who thought they couldn’t dance dancing beautifully in the dark.” Stacey D’Erasmo describes the freedom of writing, minus the byline.

    Authors
  14. Queens of Infamy: The Rise of Catherine de’ Medici

    At Longreads, Anne Thériault wittily chronicles the early trials and tribulations of Renaissance queen Catherine de’ Medici, from her childhood in war-ravaged Florence to the first few years of her fraught marriage with the heir to the French throne.

    Essay
    Illustration by Louise Pomeroy.
  15. The Ugly History of Beautiful Things: Perfume

    Sometimes it takes a touch of darkness (from the “glandular sacs of dead musk deer” to particularly putrid flowers) to create something alluring.

    Culture