Longreads Filter
  1. The Believer Magazine

    The Believer is a bimonthly literature, arts, and culture magazine that publishes journalism, essays, interviews, comics, poetry, a symposium around a theme, and a column by Nick Hornby.

    Culture
  2. Columbine, 20 Years Later

    Was it possible, we wondered, that Columbine, that seminal moment in American history, had taught us nothing?” A special issue at 5280 covers the community of Columbine, Colorado, 20 years after the Columbine High School shooting.

    Commentary
  3. Alta

    Alta publishes writing on the issues, culture, personalities, politics, lifestyle, and history of California and the West.

    Culture
    Photo by Oscar Salgado from Pexels
  4. Wandling Free?

    Musings at Richly Evocative on the Wandle in London: “Walking next to a river, perhaps especially an urban survivor like the Wandle, is the chance to connect with something beyond ourselves. Where the river goes and how it turns, or loops back on itself, meanders and twists, is often nothing to do with us humans.”

    Environment
  5. The Teen Idol Vanishes

    “Without 24/7 media, without the internet, a fiction like Dylan McKay could overtake a fact like Luke Perry.” 90210 star Luke Perry’s untimely death reminds us that Dylan McKay was one of the last icons of adolescence.

    Commentary
    Adam Scull / AP, Getty, Collage by Katie Kosma
  6. Reading in the Age of Constant Distraction

    “What I do when I look at Twitter is less akin to reading a book than to the encounter I have with a recipe’s instructions or the fine print of a receipt: I’m taking in information, not enlightenment.” Mairead Small Staid explores the work of Sven Birkerts and reading in our digital age.

    Books
    JOHAN GUDMUNDSEN-HOLMGREEN, LAESENDE LILLE PIGE, 1900
  7. The Indignities of Poverty, Compounded by the Requirement to Prove It

    In an excerpt from her debut memoir, WordPress.com blogger-turned-author Stephanie Land recalls moving from a homeless shelter to transitional housing with her young daughter.

    Authors
  8. My Year of Writing Anonymously

    “I found that when students wrote without their names, much that was awkward, dull, strained, and frankly boring fell away. It was like watching people who thought they couldn’t dance dancing beautifully in the dark.” Stacey D’Erasmo describes the freedom of writing, minus the byline.

    Authors
  9. Queens of Infamy: The Rise of Catherine de’ Medici

    At Longreads, Anne Thériault wittily chronicles the early trials and tribulations of Renaissance queen Catherine de’ Medici, from her childhood in war-ravaged Florence to the first few years of her fraught marriage with the heir to the French throne.

    Essay
    Illustration by Louise Pomeroy.
  10. The Ugly History of Beautiful Things: Perfume

    Sometimes it takes a touch of darkness (from the “glandular sacs of dead musk deer” to particularly putrid flowers) to create something alluring.

    Culture
  11. In Search of Beirut’s Collective Memory

    Journalist Iain Akerman follows Mona El Hallak, a Lebanese architect and activist, as she tries to reconstruct facets of the city’s past through the archive of a long-defunct photographer’s studio.

    Culture
  12. A Beast for the Ages

    Why do we love (and fear, and kill) polar bears with so much intensity? At Longreads, Michael Engelhard, a wilderness guide and anthropologist, looks into the Arctic predator’s grip on our imagination.

    Animals
  13. In Sudan, Rediscovering Ancient Nubia Before It’s Too Late

    At Undark, Amy Maxmen follows the archaeologists and scientists who are racing to document what’s left of the ancient African civilization of Nubia.

    Culture
    Photo by Neil Brandvold (Undark)
  14. The Country Where Fútbol Comes First

    If you love soccer, you probably enjoy a good underdog story. Here’s Uruguay’s: a small country with a rich World Cup legacy, which Candace Rose Rardon lovingly retells in her illustrated essay on Longreads.

    Culture
  15. Forgetting the Madeleine

    At Longreads, Paris-based pastry chef Frances Leech reflects on taste, memory, and literature’s most famous confection: the humble madeleine, immortalized in Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time.

    Cooking