Identity Filter
  1. How to Write Your About Page

    “The key is to avoid thinking of your About page as something that’s set in stone. Look at it like a canvas where every brushstroke adds a new layer of texture and color, adding richness to your story.” This Own Your Content toolkit provides tips and resources for crafting your About page.

    Identity
  2. A Collection Devoted to Intimate Trans Stories

    “For too long they’d had their lives overwritten or misrepresented.” The Museum of Transology, currently at the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery in the UK, curates quotidian objects that tell the stories of trans people.

    Identity
  3. dapperQ

    DapperQ is a queer style magazine. “We inspire people of all sexual orientations, gender identities, and gender presentations to think differently about both queer fashion and beauty as art and visual activism, and ultimately have a deeper, more fulfilling relationship with style.”

    Fashion
  4. WordPress Websites of LGBTQ+ Organizations Around the World

    At Out in Tech events, tech professionals build websites for LGBTQ+ organizations. Here’s a look at 10 sites launched at past hackathons.

    Diversity
  5. The Radical Notion of Not Letting Work Define You

    “Just because something can’t be a career doesn’t have to mean that it can’t be part of your life and identity.” At Man Repeller, Molly Conway muses on imposter syndrome, work and identity, and being a playwright.

    Identity
  6. What it means to become British

    From Nadia El-Awady: “I come from a culture that tends to glorify non-elected, autocratic, all-powerful leaders. They have to. The consequences of not doing so are not pretty. So I’ve grown up with a disdain for the glorification of single human beings; even those that don’t have much power.”

    Commentary
  7. Dani Shapiro on her new memoir, DNA, and more

    “Hundreds of thousands of people are discovering that they didn’t know significant aspects of their own identities.” On her blog, Leslie Lindsay interviews author Dani Shapiro about her memoir Inheritance.

    Authors
  8. We Have this Really Powerful Tool to Effect Change

    “But it became crystal-clear that queer youth needed to see what their futures could look like. They needed to see that there was light at the end of the tunnel…” Brett M. Peters from the It Gets Better Project talks about the power of uplifting storytelling.

    Diversity
  9. An Extraordinary Machine

    “Same kid. Different wrapper.” In 2004, the Smartypants family adopted baby Nora. In 2018, they amended Nora’s Certificate of Foreign Birth when Nora transitioned, changing his name Aaron.

    Family
  10. “I carried shame from generations I had never even met. Generations who had shame imposed on them for nothing more than being the wrong people at the wrong time. Wrong stories, wrong skin. I have lived a life carrying things that were never mine to carry in the first place.”

    Identity
  11. Dentalium and Dreams Beyond the University

    Indigenous grad school student Erica Violet Lee meditates on wealth and abundance: “I want wealth by our definitions, because their definitions will always label us needy, at-risk, poor. I want abundance, in all the ways we define it for ourselves.”

    Academia
  12. Three Stories to Read this LGBT History Month

    From The Golden Girls to 17th-century London, these stories explore the rich layers of queer history.

    Commentary
    Berlin's memorial to the first gay emancipation movement. Image by Alorin via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0)
  13. When Love Wins

    Sahitya Poonacha reacts to the Supreme Court of India’s landmark decision to decriminalize gay sex: “Society still has a long way to go, but now with the court on love’s side, it gives the confidence to the people who are afraid.”

    Current Events
    Photo by Kandukuru Nagarjun (CC BY 2.0)
  14. The Time Ladies

    Time traveling aliens know no gender: welcome to the blog for female Doctor Who fans, by female Doctor Who fans.

    Gender
  15. Are There Limits to Self-Identity Language?

    “When a marginalized person claims language to describe their oppressed identity, they are speaking themself into existence in a society that is trying to annihilate them.”

    Gender