History Filter
  1. Architectural Afterlife

    “People were here once, living and working and now they are gone while the collapsing ruins remain a place that is looked past by so many.” Preserving history through imagery, Cleveland, Ohio-based photojournalist Johnny Joo documents the history of decaying, forgotten places across the US.

    Architecture
  2. Groundhog Day

    Happy Groundhog Day! The University of Manchester Museum explores the origin of this annual winter tradition, which has its roots in European folklore.

    Education
    PUNXSUTAWNEY, PA - FEBRUARY 2: Groundhog handler John Griffiths holds Punxsutawney Phil after he saw his shadow predicting six more weeks of winter during 128th annual Groundhog Day festivities on February 2, 2014 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Groundhog Day is a popular tradition in the United States and Canada. A smaller than usual crowd this year of less than 25,000 people spent a night of revelry awaiting the sunrise and the groundhog's exit from his winter den. If Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow he regards it as an omen of six more weeks of bad weather and returns to his den. Early spring arrives if he does not see his shadow, causing Phil to remain above ground. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
  3. History: the Ghost at the Feast

    “Real life very rarely supplies us with strong, convincing narratives so we create our own in order to give ourselves a sense of purpose and meaning.” Ben Newmark contemplates the teaching of history and creating our own narratives on a personal and larger scale.

    Education
  4. Cuisine Helvetica

    Heddi, an American blogger living in Switzerland, takes us beyond cheese and chocolate to discover the rich culture and traditions of Swiss food.

    Cooking
  5. The 99 Best Things that Happened in 2017

    Many might want to forget 2017 ever happened; at Quartz, Angus Harvey compiled a list of 99 things that might help salvage the image of the year that just ended.

    Culture
  6. Going Underground to Explore London’s Secret Tunnels

    Guy Shrubsole digs up land-registry data to discover a secret network of Cold War-era tunnels just beneath central London — maps included.

    Data
  7. Longreads Best of 2017: All of Our No. 1 Story Picks

    Looking for some good reading during the holiday season? Here’s every story that was chosen as number one in Longreads’ Weekly Top 5 email.

    Authors
    By Kjell Reigstad
  8. Mosul Eye

    For the past three years, scholar and historian Omar Mohammed has documented life in Mosul, Iraq under the brutal, extremist Islamic State.

    History
  9. “These babushkas survived Stalin and the Nazis. . . . How can they be expected to fear something neither male nor foreign, that does not even have feral teeth, but whose only crime is that it breathes and disappears into the same air.”

    Commentary
  10. Shackleton’s Voyage, Illustrated

    Artist Alice recreates Ernest Shackleton’s voyage with surreal and foreboding illustrations.

    Art
    An illustration of Ernest Shackleton's voyage, by Alice at Owl Station.
  11. Don’t Talk About “Race Cards” Unless You Want to Talk About Who Built The Deck

    “While it’s possible for this term to exist in a neutral sense, it most certainly does not.  This term exists for the sole purpose of silencing black people, policing black thought, and to protect white privilege and white comfort.”

    History
  12. Sgt. Thomas Holmes, Canada’s Youngest Victoria Cross Recipient

    In honor of Remembrance Day (Veterans Day in the US), meet Sgt. Thomas Holmes, Canada’s youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross — the highest award of the United Kingdom honors system — presented for gallantry “in the face of the enemy.”

    History
  13. Blanket Statement

    Chelsea Vowel on why the Hudson’s Bay blanket is an important symbol to the Métis people: “The fact is that wool is warm even when wet, dries quickly and is easy to sew. These are all important considerations in climes that can reach temperatures of minus 40 degrees Celcius.”

    Commentary
    Photo by Danielle Scott
  14. diaCRITICS

    Co-founded by Pulitzer-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen, diaCRITICS covers the arts, culture, and politics of Vietnamese diasporas around the world.

    Art
    Image by manhhai (CC BY 2.0)
  15. Freer|Sackler

    Explore the richness of Asian cultures and arts, from ancient Egypt to contemporary Japan, at the new website of the Smithsonian’s Asian collections.

    Art
    Image courtesy of Freer|Sackler