History Filter
  1. Columbine, 20 Years Later

    Was it possible, we wondered, that Columbine, that seminal moment in American history, had taught us nothing?” A special issue at 5280 covers the community of Columbine, Colorado, 20 years after the Columbine High School shooting.

    Commentary
  2. National Pie Week: Pie-Off in Special Collections

    In celebration of National Pie Week, the staff of Special Collections at the University of St Andrews used recipes from antique cookbooks to make sweet and savory pies for a potluck pie-off.

    Cooking
    Recipe for Venison Pasty from the Edwards family cookbook (c. 1800)
  3. Architecture
  4. History of Ornithology

    At the American Ornithological Society’s History of Ornithology, site you can explore a field of science “populated by interesting characters, adventure, intrigue and discoveries, that guided the development of many aspects of biology.”

    History
  5. My Goal Since the Beginning Was to Individualize the Victims

    “By colorizing their photographs, they become less abstract. They are no longer just representing something old, a historical event that happened so many years ago.” For the Faces of Auschwitz project, photo colorist Marina Amaral transforms photos of Holocaust victims.

    Education
  6. Lit Hub’s Most Anticipated Books of 2019

    Start planning your 2019 reading schedule with Literary Hub’s exhaustive list of exciting future releases — including numerous titles by women writers and writers of color.

    Authors
  7. Time Gents

    Time Gents is a labor of love by Sydney journalist, blogger, and pub historian Mick Roberts, where he documents the stories, traditions, and images of hotels and pubs all over Australia.

    Architecture
  8. History Extra

    From Tudor Christmas traditions to 19th-century fashion, History Extra — the blog of the BBC History Magazine — brings the past back to life in all its quirks.

    Culture
  9. The Grey Fox: Legendary Train Robber Billy Miner

    The Library and Archives Canada blog shares their collection on Billy Miner, a notorious train robber and serial prison escape artist. “The Gentleman Bandit,” as he was known on both sides of the Canada–U.S. border, was seen as generous folk hero to many.

    Education
  10. Finger-Ring Lore

    Did you know that, ‘A dove, carrying an olive branch in its mouth, engraved in pyrites and mounted in a silver ring ensured the wearer the utmost hospitality wherever he went, as it conveyed the power of “fascination.”?’ Learn more about rings at the Maynooth University Library blog.

    History
    Maynooth University Library Archives
  11. Convivial Supper

    Erin O’Reilly is a lay antique cookbook hobbyist. At Convivial Supper, she shares fascinating and curious excerpts from cookbooks, cooking posters, and recipes in the public domain, printed prior to 1922.

    Cooking
  12. Dentalium and Dreams Beyond the University

    Indigenous grad school student Erica Violet Lee meditates on wealth and abundance: “I want wealth by our definitions, because their definitions will always label us needy, at-risk, poor. I want abundance, in all the ways we define it for ourselves.”

    Academia
  13. Top 40 Weekly

    Whether you’re a music, history, or stats lover, you’ll find new things to learn and new ways to while away your time at Top 40 Weekly, a huge archive of pop-music data going back to the 1950s.

    Culture
  14. The Arcade Blogger

    If vintage arcade games make you feel warm with nostalgia (even if you weren’t born yet when they first appeared), Tony Temple’s posts at The Arcade Blogger will be right up your alley.

    Culture
  15. Three Stories to Read this LGBT History Month

    From The Golden Girls to 17th-century London, these stories explore the rich layers of queer history.

    Commentary
    Berlin's memorial to the first gay emancipation movement. Image by Alorin via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0)