History Filter
  1. David Walbert

    Writer and crafstman David Walbert publishes thoughtful essays, observations, poems, stories, and other formats on history, food and agriculture, culture and religion, education, and craft work.

    Authors
  2. A Historical Walk in the English Lake District

    “It’s been a poignant, thought-provoking journey, punctuated by two monuments: one to a way of life; one to life extinguished; and both inextricably bound to the mountain.” In this longread, George Kitching guides us over the Coniston mountains in the English Lake District, diving into the history and culture of the area.

    Exploration
    Photo by George Kitching
  3. Medievalists.net

    From recent archaeological discoveries to articles on pop-culture references to the so-called “Middle Ages,” the writers behind Medievalists.net aim to bring history alive.

    Architecture
  4. Dear HBO: About that Alt-Reality “Confederate” Show

    From Michael W. Twitty: “Your show concept is cool until we begin to think of all the other alt-history moments that would be equally provocative but seem unimaginable because of our addictive, national obsession with structurally racist ideas.”

    Commentary
  5. Springtime

    Time zones: why do we have them? Science blogger Jon Farrow explains: “The answers to these questions, like so much that is great in this world, involve two of my favourite things: Canada and astronomy.”

    History
  6. White Women In Robes 

    “White women in robes are marching in the streets again, and they are still leaving people of color behind.” Sherronda J. Brown discusses how eugenics, reproductive rights, white feminism, and white supremacy are historically and intricately connected.

    Commentary
  7. Hobby Lobby’s Parallel Universe of Antiquity Studies

    From Fiona Greenland: “You don’t have to be a Near Eastern specialist to be concerned about the broader outcomes of a private group, with a pronounced political and religious agenda, having the power to control the empirical underpinnings of a discipline.”

    Academia
  8. The Secret Knowledge of Spaces

    Susie Trexler — an architectural historian by trade and architecture admirer by passion — shares her love of places, spaces, and the stories they tell.

    Architecture
  9. Circulating Now Celebrates 20 Years of Harry Potter!

    J. K. Rowling published Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone on June 26, 1997. The blog of the National Library of Medicine’s historical collections celebrates 20 years of Harry Potter with a series of posts, a curated collection, and lectures.

    Books
  10. Centuri Aztarac: Finding THE Holy Arcade Grail

    The incredible story of the Centuri Aztarac: imagine finding a rare 80s arcade game languishing in a basement only to discover it was the personal machine of the man who coded the game.

    Culture
  11. Inventing (the) English: Racism, Multilingualism and Medieval Studies

    “The medieval past is being weaponised by a group of people who would be disgusted by the reality of the racial past they so fondly imagine.” Rachel Moss on the alt-right’s fascination with (and distortion of) medieval history.

    Commentary
  12. The Female Gaze

    “A journal for those who like to view the world as a work of art,” The Female Gaze is published by a group of women who explore and write about visual media, from film to architecture.

    Art
  13. Why I Wrote “Walt’s Disneyland”

    “I believe Walt built Disneyland as a gift to his own inner child . . .” Jim Denney explains why he wrote his new book, Walt’s Disneyland.

    Authors
  14. Cuba Counterpoints

    At Cuba Counterpoints, writers and scholars look at the culture and politics of a rapidly changing, increasingly open Cuba.

    Commentary
  15. History