History Filter
  1. On Chernobyl: “These babushkas survived Stalin and the Nazis…How can they be expected to fear something neither male nor foreign, that does not even have feral teeth, but whose only crime is that it breathes and disappears into the same air.”

    Commentary
  2. Shackleton’s Voyage, Illustrated

    Artist Alice recreates Ernest Shackleton’s voyage with surreal and foreboding illustrations.

    Art
    Illustration by Alice.
  3. Don’t Talk About “Race Cards” Unless You Want to Talk About Who Built The Deck

    “While it’s possible for this term to exist in a neutral sense, it most certainly does not.  This term exists for the sole purpose of silencing black people, policing black thought, and to protect white privilege and white comfort.”

    History
  4. Sgt. Thomas Holmes, Canada’s Youngest Victoria Cross Recipient

    In honor of Remembrance Day (Veterans Day in the US), meet Sgt. Thomas Holmes, Canada’s youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross — the highest award of the United Kingdom honors system — presented for gallantry “in the face of the enemy.”

    History
  5. Blanket Statement

    Chelsea Vowel on why the Hudson’s Bay blanket is an important symbol to the Métis people: “The fact is that wool is warm even when wet, dries quickly and is easy to sew. These are all important considerations in climes that can reach temperatures of minus 40 degrees Celcius.”

    Commentary
    Photo by Danielle Scott
  6. diaCRITICS

    Co-founded by Pulitzer-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen, diaCRITICS covers the arts, culture, and politics of Vietnamese diasporas around the world.

    Art
    Image by manhhai (CC BY 2.0)
  7. Freer|Sackler

    Explore the richness of Asian cultures and arts, from ancient Egypt to contemporary Japan, at the new website of the Smithsonian’s Asian collections.

    Art
    Image courtesy of Freer|Sackler
  8. Native Appropriations

    Adrian Keene, the writer behind Native Appropriations, focuses on current events and popular culture through the lens of Native American representation.

    Commentary
  9. Sphinx: Exploring Antiquity and Modernity

    Neville Morley is a UK-based classics and ancient-history scholar. On his blog, he draws connections between his field of study and contemporary culture and politics.

    Academia
  10. A Moveable Feast: A Brief History of the Revolving Restaurant

    From the archives of J. S. Graboyes’ Duck Pie blog, a look into the origins of an unnecessary-yet-fascinating 20th-century invention.

    Architecture
  11. A Taxi Driver’s Life In San Francisco Before Uber

    “‘With app-based transportation,’ he explains, ‘the pick up and drop off points, along with the route, are recorded. You know the passenger’s name before they get in the car. They know yours.’” Pete Brook talks with cab driver Kelly Dessaint on Bill Washburn’s vivid taxi images from the 1980s.

    Culture
    Image by Bill Washburn via Prison Photography
  12. Gastronomica

    The go-to journal for important conversations about food, probing questions about the role of food in everyday life through studies of historical trends, analyses of the politics and economics of food production and consumption, and creative reflections on food.

    Culture
  13. You Can See the Battle Scars

    In Venezuela, journalist Christian Borys talks to the young activists who are torn between leaving for a better future elsewhere, and fighting on in a country that’s becoming less and less livable.

    Current Events
  14. The Treeographer

    Nick Rowan, a writer based in Spain, tells the true histories of significant or symbolic trees around the world. “I started to see the world through a new lens, with a new-found appreciation for the everyday trees that I previously walked past without a second glance.”

    Environment
  15. Berfrois

    Founded and edited by Russell Bennetts, Berfrois is a literary-intellectual online magazine based in London, England, covering a range of subjects from poetry to philosophy and science to economics.

    Art