Essay Filter
  1. How Do We Write Now?

    Patricia Lockwood on writing in a time of distractions: “The feeling you get after hours of scrolling that all your thoughts have been replaced with cotton candy . . . as opposed to the feeling of being open to poetry, to being inside the poem, which is the feeling of being honey in the hive.”

    Essay
  2. The Role of Imagination in Creative Nonfiction

    Heather Thomson at Commonplace Book Blog explores fact, memory, and imagination in creative nonfiction: “But there is a middle ground, one which is perhaps the most difficult to do well, but the one I feel is most rewarding as a reader, and perhaps most faithful to how the mind works.”

    Books
  3. The Undiscovered Territory

    “Books and articles have been written about reverse culture shock. The identity crisis. . . . I find this state of consciousness intriguing rather than distressing. The thrill of disorientation and shattered perceptions. Besides, I never fit in to begin with.” J.D. Riso returns home after 19 years of a nomadic life.

    Essay
  4. “I’m more of a binge writer. I have to pull way back and let my creative pulse breathe. Then, at some point, I go in and I write and write and write…. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve learned to respect the cyclic nature of my creative life.”

    Essay
  5. On Fear

    Writer and political organizer Alex Press on fear: “It’s hard to imagine such a state of mind, writing from the present. Ours feels like a time of fear, defined by it much as I was then defined by its absence.”

    Abuse
  6. Essay: Sorrow for the Wings

    Writer Shawn McClure remembers baby chicks: “In the basement of his old farmhouse, my grandfather had a brooder. It looked like a multi-storied apartment building for chicks. They would crowd around the light bulb for heat, like yellow electrons darting around a red nucleus.”

    Animals
  7. Journalist Natalia Antonova on writing about abuse: “Being vulnerable is not just about opening up to other people — it’s about opening up to yourself. Knowing yourself. Knowing what you are actually capable of.”

    Abuse
  8. Document Journal

    Document is a New York City-based magazine devoted to essays and visual storytelling on art, fashion, and travel (among other topics).

    Art
  9. The Untold Story of a Prison Guard’s Struggle

    Tyler Caffee recounts his sister Jami’s experience while working at Corcoran State Prison in California, one of the highest security prisons in the US. The essay raises awareness of the increased risk of suicide for female correctional officers and is part of the Unofficial Archives series at Tropics of Meta.

    Commentary
  10. I remembered the tree and the tree remembered me

    “I remember going for a walk in the woods behind my house instead, finding this tree and carving my initials into it, pressing the sadness and rejection into its innocent bark.” At Kindred, Kerstin Pless Grant recalls being 14 and rediscovers a tree she had hoped to return to someday.

    Essay
  11. No distance left to run

    An essay on escape and self-discovery by Regina Belmonte: “There is no race to relevance here, nothing to live up to, and no ladders to climb — just a gentle shift from one day to another, and a train or two to catch to the next destination. Breathing room, and space to explore myself…”

    Essay
  12. Meanjin

    One of Australia’s leading and longest-running literary journals, Meanjin Quarterly publishes essays, fiction, and poetry by authors ranging from the up and coming to the globally celebrated.

    Authors
  13. The Center Everywhere

    “Of all the things that I am sure about, I am sure that my perception does not describe the reality, it is only my reality.” At A Light Circle, M.P. Baecker writes a thoughtful, poignant essay on self-centeredness and awareness.

    Essay
  14. TRUE

    Brought to you by the makers of Proximity Magazine, True publishes weekly interviews and essays on the craft of memoir and telling true stories.

    Essay
  15. The MFA Years

    Founded and edited by Caitlin Neely, The MFA Years follows the experiences of first and second year MFA candidates in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

    Academia