Education Filter
  1. The Problem with “Pretty Girls” and Princesses

    “Our world focuses on the looks of girls and the accomplishments of boys.” At OTV Magazine, Angela Noel reflects on the gendered compliments adults give children, and how they make it hard for girls to separate their self-worth from their appearance.

    Commentary
  2. Four Education Blogs to Explore this Back-to-School Season

    Whether they tackle tough topics or inspire better learning habits, these sites prompt readers to think, question, and engage.

    Diversity
  3. Ten Reasons Why Students Should Read Whole Books over Excerpts

    As the school year is kicking into gear in many countries, Cari White, a librarian in Texas, gives parents and educators 10 reasons to encourage young readers to tackle entire works.

    Books
  4. “These ‘rules’ have shown impressive staying power. From cocktail parties to kitchen tables, these seemingly fascinating bits of grammar trivia have been repeated over and over, in some cases for centuries. Too bad they’re not true.”

    Commentary
  5. On Boy Books and Girl Books

    “Can we all agree that there is no such thing as a girl or a boy book?” Teacher and parent Pernille Ripp writes on the toxic effects of defining books by the gender of their supposed audience.

    Books
  6. Quanta Magazine

    Quanta Magazine publishes engaging, accessible writing on mathematics, physics, and computer science, allowing a wide, curious audience to explore the latest developments in these exciting fields.

    Academia
  7. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)
  8. The Problem with “Great Schools”

    “Why do ratings in general, and Greatschool.org’s ratings in particular, perpetuate segregation and resource hoarding?” Ali McKay at Integrated Schools take a closer look at the school ratings website, GreatSchools.

    Data
  9. You should vote because hardly anyone else does, so your opinion is going to mean that much more. But mostly you should vote because this is your home and who you are, and you should take ownership of that. That’s what you do when you turn eighteen.

    Education
  10. On the Circle of Privilege

    This is what privilege looks like: “Because of that small step up, everything else was given to us. The guarantee of rest, of proper food, of an exuberance of attention that continues at the hotel we are staying at. We were given more because we had more to begin with.”

    Education
    Photo by Kapil Bhatia via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
  11. 28 MORE Black Picture Books That Aren’t About Boycotts, Buses, or Basketball (2018)

    Scott Woods at Scott Woods Makes Lists compiles a sequel to his popular 2016 list of black picture books that aren’t about boycotts, buses, and basketball.

    Books
  12. The MFA Years

    Founded and edited by Caitlin Neely, The MFA Years follows the experiences of first and second year MFA candidates in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

    Academia
  13. Groundhog Day

    Happy Groundhog Day! The University of Manchester Museum explores the origin of this annual winter tradition, which has its roots in European folklore.

    Education
    PUNXSUTAWNEY, PA - FEBRUARY 2: Groundhog handler John Griffiths holds Punxsutawney Phil after he saw his shadow predicting six more weeks of winter during 128th annual Groundhog Day festivities on February 2, 2014 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Groundhog Day is a popular tradition in the United States and Canada. A smaller than usual crowd this year of less than 25,000 people spent a night of revelry awaiting the sunrise and the groundhog's exit from his winter den. If Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow he regards it as an omen of six more weeks of bad weather and returns to his den. Early spring arrives if he does not see his shadow, causing Phil to remain above ground. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
  14. Shelf Talk

    “We’ve been ranked the nation’s most literate city several times; either we read a lot of books, or we buy a lot of books and pretend to read them.” Shelf Talk, maintained by the staff of the Seattle Public Library, is a blog for the city’s lively and diverse community of readers.

    Books
  15. History: the Ghost at the Feast

    “Real life very rarely supplies us with strong, convincing narratives so we create our own in order to give ourselves a sense of purpose and meaning.” Ben Newmark contemplates the teaching of history and creating our own narratives on a personal and larger scale.

    Education