Education Filter
  1. 28 MORE Black Picture Books That Aren’t About Boycotts, Buses, or Basketball (2018)

    Scott Woods at Scott Woods Makes Lists compiles a sequel to his popular 2016 list of black picture books that aren’t about boycotts, buses, and basketball.

  2. The MFA Years

    Founded and edited by Caitlin Neely, The MFA Years follows the experiences of first and second year MFA candidates in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

  3. Groundhog Day

    Happy Groundhog Day! The University of Manchester Museum explores the origin of this annual winter tradition, which has its roots in European folklore.

    PUNXSUTAWNEY, PA - FEBRUARY 2: Groundhog handler John Griffiths holds Punxsutawney Phil after he saw his shadow predicting six more weeks of winter during 128th annual Groundhog Day festivities on February 2, 2014 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Groundhog Day is a popular tradition in the United States and Canada. A smaller than usual crowd this year of less than 25,000 people spent a night of revelry awaiting the sunrise and the groundhog's exit from his winter den. If Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow he regards it as an omen of six more weeks of bad weather and returns to his den. Early spring arrives if he does not see his shadow, causing Phil to remain above ground. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
  4. Shelf Talk

    “We’ve been ranked the nation’s most literate city several times; either we read a lot of books, or we buy a lot of books and pretend to read them.” Shelf Talk, maintained by the staff of the Seattle Public Library, is a blog for the city’s lively and diverse community of readers.

  5. History: the Ghost at the Feast

    “Real life very rarely supplies us with strong, convincing narratives so we create our own in order to give ourselves a sense of purpose and meaning.” Ben Newmark contemplates the teaching of history and creating our own narratives on a personal and larger scale.

  6. It Gets Better

    Visit the revamped website of the It Gets Better Project to browse an archive with thousands of video stories, and to learn about their mission to empower LGBTQ youth around the world.

  7. Freer|Sackler

    Explore the richness of Asian cultures and arts, from ancient Egypt to contemporary Japan, at the new website of the Smithsonian’s Asian collections.

    Image courtesy of Freer|Sackler
  8. Become a Civil Engineer

    Considering a career in civil engineering? Look no further than site pick Become a Civil Engineer to learn about various disciplines and what it takes to be successful in the industry.

  9. The Iris

    The official blog of the Getty, in Los Angeles, The Iris aims to educate and inspire art lovers with articles on topics ranging from ancient crafts to modern architecture.

  10. World Vision: No Child For Sale

    World Vision’s “No Child For Sale” campaign aims to educate Canadian consumers about child labor being used within the supply chain.

  11. For These Fourth Graders, A Project On Immigration Hits Home

    In Miriam Sicherman’s class, the students interview immigrants about their experiences in coming to America. These oral histories explore complex emotions about new beginnings.

    Photo by Kimberly M. Wang/Eardog Productions
  12. Photos from Bangladesh: A Campaign with World Vision Canada

    Photographer Sophia Hsin uses her camera to speak out against child labor: “Now that I know about these things, it seems quite foolish to stay silent.”

    Photo by Sophia Hsin
  13. Parent Co.

    With equal doses of information, inspiration, and opinion, Parent Co. is a modern parenting site that caters to families with children of all ages, genders, and needs.


    From recent archaeological discoveries to articles on pop-culture references to the so-called “Middle Ages,” the writers behind aim to bring history alive.

  15. The Power of Poetry

    “Can anyone have this moment? Or is poetry only for some people — the smartest, the richest, the something-est?” At Nerdy Book Club, K-8 librarian Sarah FitzHenry recounts a school event with poet Kwame Alexander in which students discover the power of poetry.

    Photo via Nerdy Book Club