Diversity / Posts Filter
  1. On Boy Books and Girl Books

    “Can we all agree that there is no such thing as a girl or a boy book?” Teacher and parent Pernille Ripp writes on the toxic effects of defining books by the gender of their supposed audience.

    Books
  2. Why I Owe Everything to Jonathan Gold

    “Being a food writer is the most punk rock thing a person can do, and Jonathan Gold was the most punk rock of us all.” Javier Cabral pays homage to the legendary Los Angeles food writer, who was both his mentor and his role model.

    Current Events
    Illustration by Joaquin Hernandez
  3. Really, libraries don’t need reinventing, thanks.

    Librarian Deb Baker rejects a recent op-ed calling for Amazon to replace public libraries: “Libraries are often the only egalitarian spaces in American communities, radically welcoming of everyone who comes through their doors.”

    Books
  4. Digging into the Racial Politics of ‘Ugly Delicious’

    David Chang’s Ugly Delicious explores some nuanced ideas around race and food while also reproducing some harmful cultural narratives. Media culture Ph.D. student Rachel Kuo identifies five ways she’d like the show to push further.

    Cooking
  5. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)
  6. The Problem with “Great Schools”

    “Why do ratings in general, and Greatschool.org’s ratings in particular, perpetuate segregation and resource hoarding?” Ali McKay at Integrated Schools take a closer look at the school ratings website, GreatSchools.

    Data
  7. Cancel out the Doubt

    Team USA Paralympian Andrew Kurka writes on his hopes for PyeongChang: “There are so many responsibilities, so many thoughts, and so much good I want to do. When looking at it all, the journey, the sacrifice, the glory.”

    Current Events
  8. Dear POC: We Get Depressed Too

    Joséphine Mwanvua on the difficulty of asking for help as a person of color: “Here, in the West, black communities and other POC communities still carry a taboo around mental health issues.”

    Culture
  9. 28 MORE Black Picture Books That Aren’t About Boycotts, Buses, or Basketball (2018)

    Scott Woods at Scott Woods Makes Lists compiles a sequel to his popular 2016 list of black picture books that aren’t about boycotts, buses, and basketball.

    Books
  10. All My Stories Are Political. I Checked.

    Phenderson Djèlí Clark on getting political in sci-fi/fantasy: “It informs my writing. It informs my characters. It informs my imagination. It informs my very reason for creating. I guess I’ve always known I was a political writer of SFF. Because there are no ‘non-sci-fi/fantasy issues.’”

    Authors
  11. 14 Art & Design Podcasts Hosted by Women

    Michelle Kondrich and Thomas James at Illustration Age curated a selection of women-led podcasts that focus on art, design, and visual culture.

    Art
    Illustration by Thomas James
  12. I’m Black, and I think Richard Spencer Should Speak At The University of Michigan

    “Let him expand upon all his twisted thoughts and ideals on a grand stage. Let him see just how meaningless his words really are, because at the end of the day he can’t change what we are.”

    Academia
  13. How Responsible Tourism Can Challenge Patriarchy in India

    At The Shooting Star, travel writer Shivya Nath writes on the positive social effects of responsible, sustainable tourism.

    Culture
  14. Atlee

    “It was only in getting back into baseball cards that I realized that there were a couple of years in the late 1980s when my classmates had accurately identified a mixed-race adult for me to look like.” Nick Vossbrink at njwv writes about dealing with the “what are you?” question while growing up.

    Culture
  15. I Don’t Accommodate Uncontrolled Men

    “I don’t have any sympathy for men who can’t handle a woman with cleavage.” At Ezer, Bailey Steger writes a critique of purity culture from an egalitarian Christian perspective.

    Commentary