Death Filter
  1. Who We Are: A Letter to The Shrine

    Battling her own cancer and in the throes of chemotherapy, Denise Archer used a late friend’s clothing to make quilts for the children she left behind. “Some of your mom’s hair is inside,” I told them.” “Also, if you breathe in deeply, you can smell her.”

    Death
  2. The Ugly History of Beautiful Things: Perfume

    Sometimes it takes a touch of darkness (from the “glandular sacs of dead musk deer” to particularly putrid flowers) to create something alluring.

    Culture
  3. Why I Owe Everything to Jonathan Gold

    “Being a food writer is the most punk rock thing a person can do, and Jonathan Gold was the most punk rock of us all.” Javier Cabral pays homage to the legendary Los Angeles food writer, who was both his mentor and his role model.

    Current Events
    Illustration by Joaquin Hernandez
  4. What Is the Most Nostalgic Song of All Time?

    “A simple question, posed at eight o’clock on a Saturday night. I got 5,000 comments back.” At the Village Voice, Mikel Jollett writes on music’s power to evoke memory and a sense of loss.

    Commentary
  5. Ann Patchett on Philip Roth

    On Philip Roth’s death: “Now Roth has made the same mistake. He’s no longer here to represent his body of work. It’s up to us to keep reading the books. They are not of this time. They will offend a lot of people. They are some of the very best books I have ever known.”

    Authors
  6. 2018: Bubble Wrap

    In remembering his friend Jan and her keen insight into other humans, David Deitrick vows to offer real compassion to people in his life that are in need.

    Death
  7. “There’s something about the confluence of springtime and death that feels right: life ends and life starts up in an explosion of pink blossoms. I’ve got grief on one shoulder and gratitude on the other, writing a book while losing the person who was most convinced I should be writing books.”

    Authors
  8. An Interview with “Furnishing Eternity” Author David Giffels

    “It’s easier to regain the immediacy of something that’s in the near distant past than it is to step away from the immediacy of something ongoing.” Rebecca Moon Ruark chats with David Giffels on memoir writing, journaling, loss, and how he enlisted his dad to help him build his own casket.

    Authors
  9. “Cancer Is Completing My Life, Making It Whole”: The Blogging Journey of Julie Yip-Williams

    In Julie Yip-Williams’ final blog post at My Cancer Fighting Journey, she recounts her blog-to-book journey.

    Death
  10. Essay: Sorrow for the Wings

    Writer Shawn McClure remembers baby chicks: “In the basement of his old farmhouse, my grandfather had a brooder. It looked like a multi-storied apartment building for chicks. They would crowd around the light bulb for heat, like yellow electrons darting around a red nucleus.”

    Animals
  11. 1000 days

    “There was a pair of shoes at Nordstrom’s last week that Dave would have loved, but I didn’t buy them because I couldn’t remember his shoe size.
     
    And, obviously, also because dead men do not need shoes.”
     
    Ra Avis remembers her husband, 1000 days since his death.

    Death
  12. My secret battle.

    Simon Thomas on depression, anxiety, and grief:  “Right now all I can muster is the strength to hold onto that rock and try my best, to try and be as Godly a Dad as I can for Ethan and trust that out of this fog of grief all that I felt before will clear…”

    Death
  13. “So you keep a secret drawer with a few items of her favorite clothes. And you retreat to press your face into them, searching for the familiar scent of her that has long since faded.” — Suzanne Leitz on the marks left by loss.

    Death
  14. The Death Project

    Susan Briscoe’s blog documents her life with advanced terminal cancer, and focuses on her belief that “it’s important to talk about death and dying in this society that tries so hard to avoid it.”

    Culture
  15. The Shape of Goodness

    Blogger Cate remembers her friend: “Something larger and finer than a single human departs when such a person dies:  a grace, a hope, a loveliness. An encouragement in a world that desperately needs encouragement.”

    Death