Death Filter
  1. 1000 days

    “There was a pair of shoes at Nordstrom’s last week that Dave would have loved, but I didn’t buy them because I couldn’t remember his shoe size.
     
    And, obviously, also because dead men do not need shoes.”
     
    Ra Avis remembers her husband, 1000 days since his death.

    Death
  2. My secret battle.

    Simon Thomas on depression, anxiety, and grief:  “Right now all I can muster is the strength to hold onto that rock and try my best, to try and be as Godly a Dad as I can for Ethan and trust that out of this fog of grief all that I felt before will clear…”

    Death
  3. “So you keep a secret drawer with a few items of her favorite clothes. And you retreat to press your face into them, searching for the familiar scent of her that has long since faded.” — Suzanne Leitz on the marks left by loss.

    Death
  4. The Death Project

    Susan Briscoe’s blog documents her life with advanced terminal cancer, and focuses on her belief that “it’s important to talk about death and dying in this society that tries so hard to avoid it.”

    Culture
  5. The Shape of Goodness

    Blogger Cate remembers her friend: “Something larger and finer than a single human departs when such a person dies:  a grace, a hope, a loveliness. An encouragement in a world that desperately needs encouragement.”

    Death
  6. Writing Through Grief: Five Posts

    Five pieces that have deeply moved us over the last few months.

    Death
    Photo by Robert Couse-Baker (CC BY 2.0)
  7. “Stuck in her mouth was a single blade of green grass, her last effort to stave off dehydration, hypothermia, starvation, as if by swallowing that blade she could puke up death itself, like a hairball, and be well again.”

    Animals
  8. “Your parents will . . . find a cemetery, one close by, so your Mom can visit you every day; pick out a nice four by eight foot plot, maybe beside a tree, and buy the only piece of real estate you will ever own.”

    Death
  9. One Phone Call Can Change Everything

    “A lot can change in the course of one phone call.” At Commode to Joy, Jamie Muscato writes about her father’s death, her strong bond with her brother Troy, and the call that changed everything seven years ago.

    Death
  10. The Uneasy Life of a Middle East Skeleton

    “So for those who knew, it must have been very strange that we have dead bones in our closet.” The Caspers are an American expat family in Cairo, Egypt. Jayson Casper tells the story of Max, the skeleton they’ve lived with, and explores a different view of death in Middle East culture.

    Culture
  11. cleaning the house, tending the weeds.

    On the accretion of stuff: “And so, without siblings in whose faces we might see our pasts, and without children who reflect back to us ourselves and our future, we cling to the representational, the inanimate, the stuff to which we attach memory and meaning.”

    Death
  12. Goodbye Piper

    Dementia took the mind of Bruce Jenkins’ mother, but it could not erase their shared love of words. “Take a book, and read to her just as she read to you.”

    Books
  13. A Very Awkward Breakup

    “My mind was spinning. Love with a Chance of Drowning was due to publish in three months time but the love itself was drowning.” Torre DeRoche had to promote her memoir at the same time she and her partner had split. At The Fearful Adventurer, she explains what happens.

    Authors
  14. On Birds, Bullets, and Being

    Kris reflects on women, aging, invisibility, and anger, after her 50-year-old neighbor was killed by police. “Otherwise, feel free to roam about the cabin, but the bar is closed. Put on the hideous red hat, proclaim the end to your sexual being, and commence to overeat. Conversely, you could always get a gun.”

    Death
  15. On Grief, Patton Oswalt’s Engagement, and “the Heart’s Expansion”

    In a powerful viral post, Erica Roman — who lost her husband in April 2016 — replies to Patton Oswalt’s online detractors after the comedian (and widower) announced his recent engagement.

    Commentary