Culture Filter
  1. In Sudan, Rediscovering Ancient Nubia Before It’s Too Late

    At Undark, Amy Maxmen follows the archaeologists and scientists who are racing to document what’s left of the ancient African civilization of Nubia.

    Culture
    Photo by Neil Brandvold (Undark)
  2. Philately. Lately.

    Lovers of all things postal, rejoice! At Philately. Lately., Poland-based blogger Octavian shares treasures from his vast stamp collection, one post (no pun intended. Maybe.) at a time.

    Art
  3. Popula

    Popula, part of the Civil network, is “a journalist-owned, journalist-run, ad-free publication with nobody to answer to, except you.” Browse their growing archives for fresh, timely writing and art.

    Art
  4. What Is the Most Nostalgic Song of All Time?

    “A simple question, posed at eight o’clock on a Saturday night. I got 5,000 comments back.” At the Village Voice, Mikel Jollett writes on music’s power to evoke memory and a sense of loss.

    Commentary
  5. The Country Where Fútbol Comes First

    If you love soccer, you probably enjoy a good underdog story. Here’s Uruguay’s: a small country with a rich World Cup legacy, which Candace Rose Rardon lovingly retells in her illustrated essay on Longreads.

    Culture
  6. Food Fidelity

    Marwin Brown, the creator of Food Fidelity, shares modern, health-conscious soul-food recipes inspired by his love of music and informed by African diaspora culinary traditions.

    Cooking
  7. Seven Centuries of Bstila

    Anny Gaul, a scholar of North African and Middle Eastern culinary traditions, takes us on a deep dive through the centuries-long history of Bstila (or Pastilla), one of Morocco’s signature dishes (bonus: recipe included).

    Cooking
  8. Tokyo Review

    Even if you don’t live anywhere near the world’s largest city, Tokyo Review publishes timely, engaging articles that invite all readers to learn more about Japan’s economy, culture, and politics.

    Commentary
  9. This Is Why You Are Afraid of Photographing People while Traveling

    Sweden-based travel photographer Lola Akinmade Åkerström reflects on the invisible barriers that stand between her (and every traveler’s) camera and the strangers that become the subjects of many of her most powerful photos.

    Culture
    Photo by Lola Akinmade Åkerström
  10. Would the Real Queen Elizabeth Please Stand Up

    Cultural historian Benjamin Wild writes on a newly discovered portrait of Tudor monarch Elizabeth I — one that, unlike previously known depictions, doesn’t show her as a perfectly poised queen.

    Art
  11. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)
  12. The desert island.

    “…I think about all the photos of fat ladies with bodies like mine that have been used as objects of ridicule on funny cards and websites, because they dared do something as transgressive as wear a bathing suit at the beach, as though they were human or something.”

    Culture
    Illustration by Hana Jang (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).
  13. What David Read

    What David Read is a book blog that’s also a family labor of love: it’s where two sisters publish the reviews their father emails them regularly so that a wide audience might enjoy them.

    Books
  14. “Tony”: David Simon on Anthony Bourdain

    The creator of The Wire and Treme remembers his years of friendship and collaboration with the late Anthony Bourdain.

    Commentary
    Photo by Anna Hanks (CC BY 2.0)
  15. Michigan Quarterly Review

    Michigan Quarterly Review, the flagship literary journal of the University of Michigan, has been publishing fiction, essays, and poetry for over 50 years — and the entire archive is available online.

    Authors