Commentary Filter
  1. Tim Harford: The Undercover Economist

    Economist and journalist Tim Harford blends insights on technology, business, and, economic history into accessible and engaging posts on a wide range of topics, from inequality to social media.

    Business
  2. “Politics isn’t the most important thing. A supreme court nomination isn’t the most important thing. The most important thing, when stories like this are in the news, is the victim, and how we treat them, how we speak about them.”

    Abuse
  3. Design Mom

    Designer, author, and AltSummit founder Gabrielle Blair created Design Mom in 2006; since then, she’s published thousands of posts on design and parenting, travel, food, and other topics (from the evergreen to the timely).

    Commentary
  4. The Problem with “Pretty Girls” and Princesses

    “Our world focuses on the looks of girls and the accomplishments of boys.” At OTV Magazine, Angela Noel reflects on the gendered compliments adults give children, and how they make it hard for girls to separate their self-worth from their appearance.

    Commentary
  5. Preemptive Love Blog

    Preemptive Love is a U.S. nonprofit that focuses on aid and peacemaking in Iraq and Syria. Their blog tells the stories of the people and communities on the frontline, working to rebuild after years of violent conflict.

    Commentary
  6. Plodding Through The Presidents

    American history buffs, this one’s for you: Howard Dorre, who’s reading (and blogging about) a biography of every U.S. president, has published numerous posts on arcane-yet-fascinating aspects of the presidency.

    Commentary
  7. You Don’t Have to Live in Public

    Austin Kleon on the need to gain a sense of ownership over our online lives: “Back [in 2013], the worst I felt social media did was waste your time. Now, the worst social media does is cripple democracy and ruin your soul.”

    Commentary
  8. “These ‘rules’ have shown impressive staying power. From cocktail parties to kitchen tables, these seemingly fascinating bits of grammar trivia have been repeated over and over, in some cases for centuries. Too bad they’re not true.”

    Commentary
  9. Why Emily Contois Is Still Blogging After Six Years

    A recent episode of online trolling hasn’t stopped this food and media scholar from making her voice heard.

    Academia
  10. On Boy Books and Girl Books

    “Can we all agree that there is no such thing as a girl or a boy book?” Teacher and parent Pernille Ripp writes on the toxic effects of defining books by the gender of their supposed audience.

    Books
  11. Really, libraries don’t need reinventing, thanks.

    Librarian Deb Baker rejects a recent op-ed calling for Amazon to replace public libraries: “Libraries are often the only egalitarian spaces in American communities, radically welcoming of everyone who comes through their doors.”

    Books
  12. Popula

    Popula, part of the Civil network, is “a journalist-owned, journalist-run, ad-free publication with nobody to answer to, except you.” Browse their growing archives for fresh, timely writing and art.

    Art
  13. What Is the Most Nostalgic Song of All Time?

    “A simple question, posed at eight o’clock on a Saturday night. I got 5,000 comments back.” At the Village Voice, Mikel Jollett writes on music’s power to evoke memory and a sense of loss.

    Commentary
  14. Tokyo Review

    Even if you don’t live anywhere near the world’s largest city, Tokyo Review publishes timely, engaging articles that invite all readers to learn more about Japan’s economy, culture, and politics.

    Commentary
  15. What Does One Word Matter? Doctoral Women on Twitter.

    Medievalist Lucy Allen writes on the recent move among women in academia to add the title “Dr” to their Twitter name, which she views as “an act of faith, a promise to myself to keep my work from being erased.”

    Academia
    Image by Caitriana Nicholson (CC BY 2.0)