Abuse Filter
  1. I’ve been thinking

    Teri Carter recalls her grandmother’s disfigurement and Otto Warmbier’s death as she considers those who abuse their power and the true meaning of liberty.

    Abuse
  2. “Politics isn’t the most important thing. A supreme court nomination isn’t the most important thing. The most important thing, when stories like this are in the news, is the victim, and how we treat them, how we speak about them.”

    Abuse
  3. Kandahar’s Lone Female Prosecutor

    Independent journalist Maija Liuhto profiles Zainab Fayez — the lone female prosecutor in Kandahar who risks her life daily fighting for women’s rights.

    Abuse
    Photo by Ken Hendricks
  4. On Fear

    Writer and political organizer Alex Press on fear: “It’s hard to imagine such a state of mind, writing from the present. Ours feels like a time of fear, defined by it much as I was then defined by its absence.”

    Abuse
  5. Journalist Natalia Antonova on writing about abuse: “Being vulnerable is not just about opening up to other people — it’s about opening up to yourself. Knowing yourself. Knowing what you are actually capable of.”

    Abuse
  6. For My Brothers and Sisters

    “My sister and I were once in the Child Welfare System so the death of Tina Fontaine struck me personally.” At Tea&Bannock, guest blogger Kailey Arthurson’s poem calls us to defend the sacred, to defend the children.

    Abuse
    Photo by Tennille K. Campbell
  7. How I lost my mother, found my family, recovered my identity

    Betty Ann Adam recounts her experiences as a child of the “’60s Scoop” — a period which spanned 30 years in Canada — where Indigenous children were removed from their families in a government-sanctioned bid to “remove the Indian from the child.”

    Abuse
  8. Her.

    Sarah reflects on a complicated history she refuses to repeat. “I can tell you that I loved my grandmother deeply, and yet most of the tears I’ve shed over her death were for myself, because I wished that she were different.”

    Abuse
  9. What we talk about when we talk about sexual harassment

    Michael Hobbes on the societal blindness that puts the blame for harassment on the victim: “If you have never been hurt by jokes about your gender or your race or your sexuality, those who complain about them seem oversensitive.”

    Abuse
  10. Toledo, Ohio 1977

    Sean Thomas Dougherty remembers Toledo, Ohio, in the late 1970s: “We were the color of food stamps and free lunch, blue denim and wide lapels.”

    Abuse
    Photo by Daniel Pasikov (CC BY-SA 2.0)
  11. On Success

    As the writer’s success as an author grew and grew, so did the abuse at home — until finally, she left the man who she loved, but who couldn’t allow her to succeed.

    Abuse
  12. Things I Never Told Her

    At Granta, Marian Ryan pens a longform essay on rationalizing abuse, the vulnerability of the body, the failures of compassion, and being stalked on Facebook.

    Abuse
  13. Advanced Placement

    Jessica Chiccehitto Hindman’s “Advanced Placement” is a course on deconstructing abuse: “Do you want to die? He asks you over and over again.”

    Abuse
  14. Just Below the Surface: My Relationship With Alcohol

    “It stops today, I swear. Right after I finish this glass.” Danielle Dayney confronts alcoholism.

    Abuse
  15. The Abuse and Despair I Saw on a First Nations Reserve

    “I easily grew distracted, drawn into thoughts of Kashechewan. Each memory triggered anxiety, anger and guilt.” Alexandra Shimo suffered PTSD after researching her book, Invisible North: The Search For Answers on a Troubled Reserve.

    Abuse