After the Final Curtain: Matt Lambros Photographs America’s Movie Theaters in Ruins

The Loew’s Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, New York, designed by the architectural firm of Rapp and Rapp. All images courtesy of Matt Lambros, After the Final Curtain.

Abandoned architecture has fascinated Matt Lambros since he was five years old. “I’ve spent ten years composing photographic obituaries for once-thriving buildings that are now crumbled and forgotten,” the New York City-based photographer writes on his blog, After the Final Curtain.

Matt’s new book, After the Final Curtain: The Fall of the American Movie Theater, showcases 24 movie theaters across the US — once grand and lavish, now neglected. Here, in eight photographs, he offers us a glimpse into the decaying past.


The Fox Theatre in Inglewood, California, opened on March 31, 1949.
The Fox Theatre in Inglewood, California, opened in 1949. The Fox was the last theater built by 20th Century Fox before a Supreme Court case that declared movie studios were no longer allowed to own theaters and hold exclusivity rights on where their films were shown.
The Capitol Theatre, located in New London, Connecticut, opened in 1921.
The Capitol Theatre — located in New London, Connecticut — opened in 1921.
Another shot of the Loew's Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, New York, overlooking the lobby.
This shot of the Loew’s Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, New York (featured at the top of this post), overlooks the lobby.
A view of the ceiling of the Loew's Canal Theatre, which opened in 1927 in New York, New York. It was the second largest movie theater in the city when it opened, with 2,314 seats.
Looking up: a view of the ceiling of the Loew’s Canal Theatre, which opened in 1927 in New York City. It was the second largest movie theater in the city when it opened, with 2,314 seats.
The Loew's Poli Theatre in Bridgeport, Connecticut, was designed by Thomas W. Lamb, a notable architect of 20th-century theaters.
The Loew’s Poli Theatre in Bridgeport, Connecticut, was designed by Thomas W. Lamb, a notable architect of 20th-century theaters.
The Loew's Majestic Theatre, the "sister" of the Poli Theatre above, was made in the Neo-Renaissance style and also designed by Lamb.
The Loew’s Majestic Theatre, the “sister” of the Poli Theatre above, was made in the Neo-Renaissance style and also designed by Lamb.
The Paramount Theatre, located in Staten Island, New York, was designed by the same architects as the Loew’s Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, featured above.
The Paramount Theatre, located in Staten Island, New York, was designed by the same architects as the Loew’s Kings Theatre in Brooklyn.

My hope for my work is that it will shine light on beautiful, dated architecture and on the equal yet sinister beauty in decay.


Read more about Matt Lambros’ project and book at After the Final Curtain and follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. You can buy his book on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and IndieBound.

November 15, 2016Architecture, Photo Essay, Photography, Place, ,